How Does Dutch Interior I By Joan?

How does Joan Miro’s Dutch Interior I reflect Surrealistic characteristics? The artist’s creativity was used to create the features of Dutch Interior I. How did Joan Miro draw inspiration from The Lute Player by Hendrick M. Sorgh for his own work, Dutch Interior I? Miro utilized abstract, amoeba-like forms to exaggerate Sorgh’s painting’s intricacies.

How does Joan Miro’s Dutch Interior I reflect surrealistic characteristics?

How does Joan Miro’s Dutch Interior I reflect Surrealistic characteristics? The artist’s creativity was used to create the features of Dutch Interior I. How did Joan Miro draw inspiration from The Lute Player by Hendrick M. Sorgh for his own work, Dutch Interior I? Miro utilized abstract, amoeba-like forms to exaggerate Sorgh’s painting’s intricacies.

Dutch Interior I, by Joan Miro, 1928 In the summer of 1928, he traveled for the first time to the Netherlands to view paintings by his favorite Dutch Golden Age painters and. Miro reportedly stated that he admired the way Dutch artists brought out minute details like dust particles and focused attention on a small spark in the darkness.

  • This is the source of their tremendous ability to captivate.
  • Dutch Environment I is based on a picture by Hendrick Martensz Sorgh from the seventeenth century featuring a lute player in a family interior.
  • A few months before commencing his painting, Miro purchased a postcard print of the piece from the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam.

Joan Miro and his contemporaries were prompted by the teachings of to conduct extensive experiments using the purposeful suspension of conscious control in order to liberate the free flow of unconscious thinking. They literally induced hallucinations and risked insanity in order to record the forms and figures during these states on paper.

  • Miro’s Dutch Interior I depicts a guitarist in his most fundamental form.
  • He is the focal point, together with a dog, a cat, photographs on the wall, and a window against which he leans.
  • The man’s body is a massive white blob with no discernible anatomical parts.
  • Beginning at the top of the body, the head features a red circle that depicts the brain and contains the eyes and mouth.
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The eyes are two bird-like forms facing each other, and the mouth is another bird-like figure with white fangs protruding in all directions. The left ear resembles an antenna, but the right ear is the most ear-like. The left side bears the identical arm, but the hand is only a triangle.

How does Dutch Interior II work?

Dutch Interior II by Joan Miro, 1928 In 1928, during a vacation to the Netherlands, Joan Miró returned to Paris with many postcard copies of works by seventeenth-century Dutch painters. At least two of these paintings have been recognized as sources for the Dutch interior paintings at the, New York, and.

The Guggenheim’s piece Dutch Interior II is a modification of Jan Steen’s The Dancing Lesson (Collection Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam) and exhibits the fusion of meticulously studied, perfectly produced detail and imaginative generalization of form resulting from Miró’s interaction with the Dutch Baroque.

Conceptually, Dutch Interior II harkens back to works of the early 1920s, such as, 1923–1924, in its blend of objective detail and abstract vision. Through early drawings of certain ideas and a precisely finished preparatory drawing, one can observe the progressive transformation of realism into unusual, evocative shape.

Miró’s expansion and emphasis on human and animal characters, as well as his suppression or deemphasis of inanimate elements, are notable alterations to the original Dutch painting. Thus, a window in the upper center of the Steen has been drastically shrunk, as if it had been propelled into a large void.

The true topic of the Steen is not the cat, but rather the noise, motion, and comedy that the dance instruction inspires. Miró capitalizes on this peculiarity in his rendition: while the cat serves as the focal point of his centrifugal composition, he accentuates the chaos and energy of the lesson through the whirling motion of many details and the dance rhythm of points and counterpoints.