How Much Did It Cost To Build Mount Rushmore?

How Much Did It Cost To Build Mount Rushmore

How much did Mount Rushmore cost in today’s money?

The total cost of the project was $989,992 by the time it was finished in the year 1941. Taking into account the effects of inflation, the original cost would be equivalent to more than $17 million in today’s currency. – Currently under development is Mount Rushmore. Bettmann/ Getty Mount Rushmore was first constructed at a cost of $989,992, but in 1991 it had a makeover that cost $40 million.

How much did the workers on Mount Rushmore get paid?

Between the dates of October 4, 1927 and October 31, 1941 – The construction of Mount Rushmore was an endeavor of gigantic proportions, huge ambition, and tremendous accomplishment. It took the combined efforts of close to 400 men and women to accomplish.

  1. The responsibilities were quite diverse, ranging from those of a call boy and drillers to those of a blacksmith and housekeepers.
  2. During an interview with some of the people who work at Mount Rushmore, the question “What is it that you do here?” was posed.
  3. I run a jackhammer,” said one of the workers in response to the question.

Another employee had the same response when asked the same question: “I make $8.00 each day.” On the other hand, a third employee commented, “I am helping to make a monument.” The third worker had some comprehension of the objectives they were aiming to fulfill.

  • The employees were had to withstand circumstances that ranged from sweltering heat to subzero temperatures with strong winds.
  • In order to punch in and out on the time clock each day, they had to ascend 700 stairs to the peak of the mountain.
  • After that, they sat in a “bosun chair” and had 3/8-inch-thick steel cables lowering them over the front of the 500-foot-high face of the mountain.

Some of the workers stated that they were afraid of heights, but during the Great Depression, it was difficult to find work in any field. The task was thrilling, but it was also hazardous. Dynamite was used to chisel off the majority of the mountain. In order to remove a predetermined quantity of rock, the powdermen would cut and lay charges of dynamite that were of a specified size.

  1. The workmen would need to be evacuated off the mountain top in order for the dynamite charges to be able to be detonated.
  2. Hand-cranked by workers stationed in the winch house at the peak of the mountain, the drillers could be raised and lowered at will.
  3. If they progressed too quickly, the drillers who were sitting in their bosun seats risked having their faces dragged up onto the table.

To prevent something like this from taking place, young men and boys were recruited to work as call boys. Call boys would sit at the brink of the mountain and yell signals to each other to reassure people that they were safe. During the fourteen years that the building was being built, there was not a single person who lost their life.

The use of dynamite was continued until there was only three to six inches of rock remaining to clear before reaching the surface of the final sculpture. When this stage of the process had been reached, the drillers and assistant carvers would drill holes into the granite very near to one another. This activity was known as honeycombing.

Granite would become more fragile as a result of the tightly spaced holes, allowing for easier removal by hand. People who went to the location took a keen interest in the honeycombed granite and frequently inquired about how they might acquire a similar-looking rock for themselves.

In most cases, the hoist operator is the one to say “Oh, I can’t reveal any more than that. I’m keeping it for a friend of mine who works on the mountain, so I can give it to him when the time comes.” The guest would then answer by saying, “I’ll pay, and I’ll give you two dollars for it.” The person operating the hoist said, “Nope, nope, I’d really catch it if I handed away my friend’s chunk of granite,” and they repeated this again.

If the tourists were dead set on bringing home a chunk of the granite, they may submit a second bid. “If you want six dollars for that piece of honeycomb granite, here it is.” The operator of the hoist would act as though he were pausing to consider the situation, and then he would respond, “Alright, for six dollars I’m prepared to take the heat.” The operator of the hoist would hand the tourists a chunk of honeycombed granite before taking their payment of six dollars.

  • The tourist would have a very pleasant experience overall as a result of their unique and difficult to get keepsake.
  • The operator of the hoist would wait until he was certain that all of the tourists had left before dialing the number of the highest station on the mountain and demanding that they “Boys bring down another one!” Another chunk of honeycombed granite was brought down from Mount Rushmore, and it will be ready for the next tourist who comes searching for a unique keepsake from the mountain.

After the honeycombing process, the employees used a hand facer or a bumper tool to make the surface of the faces as smooth as possible. In this last stage, the granite would be evened out with a bumper tool, which would result in a surface that was as smooth as a sidewalk.

Is there a 5th face on Mount Rushmore?

5. Is there a secret fifth face etched into Mount Rushmore? – Mount Rushmore does not have a hidden fifth face carved into it. However, for almost 20 years, Ben Black Elk, who is sometimes referred to be Mount Rushmore’s fifth face, has been the person who welcomes tourists to the mountain.

Who was supposed to be the 5th President on Mount Rushmore?

Born in 1809, Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States and died in 1865. During the nation’s most trying time, the Civil War, Lincoln was able to keep the country together. Lincoln thought that the protection of the union was the most sacred task he could perform.

Who owns Mt Rushmore?

The sculptures on Mount Rushmore.

Mount Rushmore National Memorial
Authorized March 3, 1925
Visitors 2,074,986 (in 2020)
Governing body National Park Service
Website www.nps.gov/moru

How many years did it take to carve Mt Rushmore?

Mount Rushmore in Keystone, South Dakota, is home to the sculpted faces of four U.S. presidents: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln. The carving of these faces took almost 400 men and women more than 14 years to complete.

  1. David Zalubowski/AP display captions hidden or toggled David Zalubowski/AP Mount Rushmore in Keystone, South Dakota, is home to the sculpted faces of four U.S.
  2. Presidents: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln.
  3. The carving of these faces took almost 400 men and women more than 14 years to complete.

David Zalubowski/AP The death has occurred of the guy who was thought to be the final living sculptor of Mount Rushmore. Donald “Nick” Clifford was one of the almost 400 men and women that contributed to the construction of the first national monument in the United States.

According to his wife’s statement to NPR, he passed away on Saturday at the age of 98 at a hospice in Rapid City, South Dakota. Clifford, who had his final birthday in July, was filled with an overwhelming sense of pride for the work he had done on the mountainside when he was a youth. According to what he said to the Rapid City Journal, “I feel as though working on Mount Rushmore was the finest thing with which I was ever involved.” “It tells a tale that will never go away — the story of how America was formed and the men who helped make it what it is today,” she said.

“It tells a story that will never go away.” The bust memorial, which measures 60 feet in height and was sculpted by Gutzon Borglum, was finished after a period of 14 years. The faces of former U.S. Presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln were blasted and carved into the mountain in South Dakota between the years 1927 and 1941 by both men and women.

  1. The work was hard, the hours were long, the pay was low, and periods of employment were uncertain,” the National Park Service explains, adding that despite the dangerous conditions, there were no fatalities during the carving work.
  2. The work was hard, the hours were long, the pay was low,” the National Park Service explains.

Between the years 1938 and 1940, Clifford was employed there and made 55 cents an hour. According to Clifford’s wife of 45 years, Carolyn, he had spent a significant portion of his younger life anticipating employment at the location. “Nick started working at the Etta mine when he was just 15 years old since you weren’t allowed to work there until you were 17 years old.

On the other hand, the moment he reached 17, he started working on Mount Rushmore “— I quote her. When Clifford started working as a driller, the busts of Lincoln and Roosevelt were the only two presidents that needed to be sculpted. He was only six years old when work on the sculpture of Washington first begun.

In his book, Mount Rushmore Q&A, Clifford says, “I understood how to run a jackhammer, and that was the major need.” “When I started drilling Lincoln, Borglum instructed me where to drill and how to do it,” he added. “When I started drilling Lincoln, I had no idea what I was doing.” After finishing his work on the iconic faces, Clifford enlisted in the 8th Air Force and participated in the war during that time.

In the 1970s, he made his way back to Keystone to settle down there permanently. However, it wasn’t until he was far into his senior years that he started to develop the reputation of a local superstar. Although the men who worked on the mountainside eventually went their own ways, finding other jobs, expanding their families, and accomplishing new goals, a significant number of them continued to make frequent trips back to Keystone.

Carolyn said that whenever anything like this would place and Clifford reconnected with old pals, “they would always, eventually, get to chatting about the old days.” “But of course, it is no longer taking place,” she continued to say. “You know that.” Clifford expressed his sadness about the passing of his former coworkers during an interview on his 98th birthday with KOTA TV.

See also:  How To Clean Facial Pores At Home?

They have all been removed now. I am the very last person, “he added. Since 2004, Clifford and his wife have been able to be seen in the memorial’s gift shop selling copies of the book that they self-published together. “Even though he had a tendency to be reserved at times, he really enjoyed doing it.

He enjoyed going to people’s homes and providing answers to their questions “his wife stated. On the morning of November 8, Clifford told his wife that he was feeling ill while he was working at the gift store. Clifford was working at the gift shop. She rushed him to the emergency department, and he spent the final weeks of his life in and out of the hospital as a result of his condition.

Why did they stop building Mount Rushmore?

The Carving Process Gets Underway Borglum was now able to start working on the mountain in a serious manner given that the commission had been established and money had been saved. He then set about installing the machines and constructing the amenities by hiring laborers.

  • During the 1930s, Senator Norbeck exerted an incredible amount of effort in order to maintain funding for the emergency relief programs that were a part of President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.
  • This funding, along with funds that were matched from the original appropriation bill, allowed Senator Norbeck to succeed in his mission.

In 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 6166, which resulted in significant alterations to the way the project was managed. Mount Rushmore was now under the control of the National Park Service and was overseen by engineer Julian Spotts, who immediately began looking for methods to increase both productivity and the circumstances under which workers were required to do their jobs.

Gutzon Borglum was never comfortable with having authority over his projects exercised by third parties. As a result, he grew dissatisfied of being under “the watchful eye of the government.” In 1938, Borglum was able to effectively transfer management of the undertaking to an appointed commission, which consisted primarily of individuals he had selected.

Borglum was able to exert practically entire control over the majority of features of the project as a result of the new commission. Borglum began building of a vast storehouse, which he named the Hall of Records, in a valley behind the sculpture during this period of increasing freedom.

  1. This archive was created with the intention of recounting the history of both Mount Rushmore and the United States.
  2. Borglum reluctantly ceased construction on the hall in 1939 when the United States Congress threatened to cut off all financing for the project unless it was used expressly to build the sculpture itself.

Because of later happenings, the completion of the Hall of Records was never achieved. A significant portion of Gutzon Borglum’s time during the project’s final two years was spent traveling and seeking to get extra funds. His son, Lincoln Borglum, was in charge of supervising the construction of Mount Rushmore while he was absent.

  • Gutzon Borglum passed away in March of 1941, just as preparations were being made for the monument’s formal dedication.
  • This fact, along with the fact that the United States was about to get involved in World War II, led to the conclusion of the construction activity on the mountain.
  • Mount Rushmore National Memorial was officially deemed finished as a construction project on October 31, 1941.

The creation of Mount Rushmore National Memorial presented a number of challenges, including obtaining authorization to cut a mountain, obtaining finance, and successfully managing a diverse group of personalities. It frequently appeared more challenging to those working in the project to keep the project going ahead than it was to actually carve the granite into a monumental sculpture representing the four presidents.

How much money does Mount Rushmore make a year?

According to a recent assessment from the National Park Service, tourism at Mount Rushmore National Memorial generates an estimated total of $184.2 million in economic benefits. According to the research, there were 2.4 million people who visited Mount Rushmore in 2016 and they spent $142.2 million in the cities that are close to the park.

These expenditures helped to maintain more than 2,000 employment in the immediate region. According to Blaine Kortemeyer, “The economic impact, the economic driver for instance, nationwide it is estimated that for every $1 spent by the federal government on a national park unit, approximately $10 is given back to the local community, as far as the tourism industry is concerned, so it’s a significant amount of money and of course something that we enjoy here in the Black Hills.” According to the survey, the majority of the money spent by park visitors was on hotels, followed by restaurants, petrol stations, and retail stores.

The local economy benefited to the tune of $79.6 million from the presence of Badlands National Park, $10.2 million from the presence of Jewel Cave National Monument, and $82.8 million from the presence of Wind Cave National Park.

Where did Mt Rushmore workers stay?

During the years when the Mount Rushmore sculpture was being carved, it is reasonable to conclude that the bulk of the employees who were employed there called Keystone home. Men typically did not have to go very far to get to their places of business, hence Keystone was a popular site for them to make their homes.

  1. In comparison to the metropolitan population of Rapid City and the populations of the other major cities in the Black Hills, Keystone was a rural village that lacked modern conveniences such as indoor bathrooms and running water.
  2. There was an abundance of housing, but a significant number of the homes weren’t particularly appealing to potential buyers.

Around the turn of the century, there were a lot of homes on the market that had been left behind from the mining industry’s heyday. Keystone fell into a condition of despair when, in June of 1903, the Holy Terror Mine stopped producing gold and stopped operating.

It wasn’t until the 1920s that production of feldspar and other pegmatite minerals including mica, amblygonite, beryl, lepidolite, and spodumene began in Keystone, marking the beginning of the town’s renaissance. The majority of Keystone’s miners and merchants left the town during the Great Depression, which caused housing and land to become available at rock-bottom prices.

During the peak of the mountain carving industry, many of the homes were purchased by businesspeople solely for the purpose of avoiding taxes and then rented out to carvers. The monthly rent for the homes ranged from $5.00 to $15.00, depending on the size of the dwelling.

It is probably fair to assume that some of the employees occupied abandoned shacks and did not pay any rent to anybody for doing so. They wanted to show their gratitude for the opportunity to have a roof over their heads, so they invested some time and effort into making the space more livable. The five members of Harold “Shorty” Pierce’s family lived in a tiny log cabin with a dirt floor next to the Etta Mine while he worked as a winchman at Mt.

See also:  How Close Can Beehives Be To A House?

Rushmore for a number of years. He paid $5.00 a month for the cabin. The majority of people did not want for luxury since they had never known what it was like to have it. It was fairly typical for people to take a bath once a week on a Saturday night in a washtub that was placed in the middle of the floor.

Electricity was considered a luxury and cost fifteen cents per kilowatt-hour to purchase. The electricity was provided by a mining firm in the area, which ran a generator using a diesel engine as its power source. As a result of the fact that the power was cut off every night at eleven o’clock, the occupants did not have the option of purchasing a refrigerator.

It was required to store milk and other perishable commodities on the floor of a dirt basement or in a fruit cellar that had been built into the slope of a hill. Both of these locations were below ground. The vast majority of people simply did not have the financial means to purchase ice to keep their ice chests stocked.

  • The ice was collected from local ponds, stored in ice cottages, and then packed in sawdust before being transported.
  • The Keystone Schoolhouse, which is currently housed by the Keystone Historical Museum, served as the educational institution of choice for the children of the employees.
  • The majority of the youngsters in the neighborhood went to classes held in one of the several one-room rural schoolhouses that were dispersed over the neighborhood.

During the years of carving, the majority of the employees did not have a clear understanding of what they were actually doing. During those trying times, it was nothing more than a job to keep oneself afloat. Every single person who worked on Mount Rushmore finally came to understand the importance of the monument and was proud of the job that they had done, in spite of the difficulties and setbacks that they had to endure.

From a great vantage point, Mount Rushmore sculptor Gutzon Borglum observes the progress of the carving on the mountain. After the drill bits had been sharpened, they were transported to the summit of Mount Rushmore using the cable car shown in the previous image. Blacksmithing duties are performed by John Nikels.

August 1941 BackRow: Orwell P. Peterson, Ernest “Ernie” Raga, Otto E. “Red” Anderson, Matthew P. Reilly, Able Joseph Happy Anderson, Ray Grover, and Norman E. “Happy” Anderson August “Joe” Bruner, Marion Gefford “Mony” Watson, J. Edwald “Ed” Hayes, and Gustav Earl E.

  1. Oaks, Jr., Louis “Gus” Schram, and Robert “Bob” Himebauagh, Albert James Lincoln Borglum, Robert Howard “Bob” Christon, and Basil “Bake” Canfield were the three individuals.
  2. In the front row is Jay.
  3. Ernest Wells, Clyde R.
  4. Spot” Denton, Fernando Shepard, Alton Parker “Hoot” Leach, and Patrick LeRoy “Pat” Bintliff were the other members of the gang.

“Bill” Reynolds, “Bay” Jurisch, “Jim” LaRue, Frank J. Maxwell, and “Johnny” Raga were the members of the team. Howard “Howdy” Peterson is now positioned in the seated position on the ground. In August of 1941, the very last team to work on Mount Rushmore posed for one last image.

Presented in the order of left to right (first row) Jay Shepard, Alton “Hoot” Leach, Clyde “Spot” Denton, Pat Bintliff, Ernest “Bill” Reynolds, Gustav “Bay” Jurisch, James “Jim” LaRue, Frank Maxwell, and John Raga were the individuals that were involved in the incident (second row) Orwell Petersen, Ernest Raga, Otto “Red” Anderson, Matthew “Matt” Reilly, and Ray Grover were the individuals in question.

In addition to Earl Oaks, Gustav “Gus” Schramm, Marion “Mony” Watson, Joseph “Joe” Bruner, Edwald “Ed” Hayes, and Norman “Happy, Hap” Anderson, the group also included Edwald “Ed” Hayes. Lincoln Borglum, Robert “Bob” Christon, Basil “Bake” Canfield, and Robert “Bob” Himebaugh were the four individuals.

Can you go inside Mt Rushmore?

Continue to the Content Your story will continue below, despite the fact that this advertising has not yet loaded. Travel USA How Much Did It Cost To Build Mount Rushmore (Images from Getty) Reviews and suggestions are written without bias, and goods are chosen without outside influence. If you make a purchase after clicking on one of the links on this page, Postmedia might get a commission for the sale. Someone should contact Nic Cage and his team of treasure hunters.

There is a hidden area inside Mount Rushmore that no one is allowed to explore. The sculptor Gutzon Borglum constructed the chamber to house information for tourists about the monument as well as knowledge about America’s history from 1776 to 1906. The chamber can be found just behind the façade of Abraham Lincoln.

Workers had already begun excavating a tunnel through the mountain in preparation for the monument; but, in 1939, Congress decided that the undertaking was not financially viable and put a halt to the project. Despite the fact that the chamber was never finished, the 70-foot tunnel may still be found.

Will Crazy Horse Monument ever be finished?

As this article is being written, it is not feasible to pinpoint a precise date for when the Crazy Horse monument will be ‘completed.’ The visible completion of the face carved into the side of the mountain occurred in the year 1998; nevertheless, there is still a significant amount of work to be done on the rest of the mountain face, guest areas, and a variety of other aspects of the resort.

What is in the secret room in Mount Rushmore?

Mount Rushmore, showing the hidden chamber that is visible right beyond the head of Abraham Lincoln. Pinterest Since he took office, President Donald Trump has rekindled an ongoing discussion regarding the meaning of the term “American.” However, it’s possible that most Americans are unaware of the mystery that lies behind one of the most recognizable political monuments in the country.

  1. Mount Rushmore’s very own “Hall of Records” is now open for business.
  2. There is a hidden chamber in the area of Abraham Lincoln’s brain that corresponds to the frontal lobe.
  3. Inside this room is the written text of some of the most significant texts in American history.
  4. The Hall of Records is an actual historical archive, despite the fact that its name sounds like something out of the movie “National Treasure” (or, more appropriately, “Richie Rich”).

The architect of the monument, Gutzon Borglum, had the idea in the 1930s to create the Hall as a storage facility for a number of historical documents that chronicle the development of the United States. Inside the building that houses the Guinness World Records exhibition.

Service des parcs nationaux Behind each of the presidents’ heads, Borglum envisioned a magnificent hall that was 80 meters wide and 100 meters long, with an adjacent staircase that was 800 meters long. A bronze eagle with a wing span of 38 feet would be hung over the doorway leading into the main hall.

According to the National Park Service, the hall would feature busts of notable Americans as well as a list of achievements made by the United States to the fields of science, art, and industry. Sadly, Borglum passed away in 1941, and as a result, he was never able to witness the realization of his vision.

The goal of the sculptor to place a record of the country’s history inside the Hall was resurrected by monument administrators in 1998, more than 50 years after the plan was originally conceived. Wikimedia Commons Today, the United States Constitution, the Declaration of Independence, the Bill of Rights, a biography of Borglum, and brief descriptions of each of the presidents featured on the monument are kept safe from prying eyes by being encased in a wooden box and hidden behind a 1,200-pound slab of granite.

Each document’s text is etched onto a set of porcelain enamel panels, which are then assembled into the book. The Hall is, however, not open to the general public (the half-ton slab probably already gave that away). The gateway, which resembles a ruin and is set back many feet into the mountain, is the only thing that anybody may approach.

  1. It may be found tucked down behind the rocky protrusion that can be seen to the right of Lincoln’s head.
  2. Observing the outside from within the entryway Service des parcs nationaux The current Hall does not have any of the ornate decorations that Borglum originally envisioned for its walls.
  3. These designs included carved accounts of America’s greatest moments, which were encircled by gigantic drawings of the Louisiana Purchase.

At least, to the best of our knowledge. Perhaps Nicolas Cage has access to information that we do not. Madeleine Deaton/Flickr

See also:  How Much Does It Cost To Build An Indoor Pool?

How much money does Mount Rushmore make a year?

According to a recent assessment from the National Park Service, tourism at Mount Rushmore National Memorial generates an estimated total of $184.2 million in economic benefits. According to the research, there were 2.4 million people who visited Mount Rushmore in 2016 and they spent $142.2 million in the cities that are close to the park.

  • These expenditures helped to maintain more than 2,000 employment in the immediate region.
  • According to Blaine Kortemeyer, “The economic impact, the economic driver for instance, nationwide it is estimated that for every $1 spent by the federal government on a national park unit, approximately $10 is given back to the local community, as far as the tourism industry is concerned, so it’s a significant amount of money and of course something that we enjoy here in the Black Hills.” According to the survey, the majority of the money spent by park visitors was on hotels, followed by restaurants, petrol stations, and retail stores.

The local economy benefited to the tune of $79.6 million from the presence of Badlands National Park, $10.2 million from the presence of Jewel Cave National Monument, and $82.8 million from the presence of Wind Cave National Park.

Where does money from Mount Rushmore go?

This day in 2012: February 28 Contact: Maureen McGee-Ballinger, 605-574-3115 KEYSTONE, S.D. – According to a study that was recently published by the National Park Service (NPS), more than 2,331,000 people visited Mount Rushmore National Memorial in 2010 and spent a total of $77.1 million there and in the communities that are located nearby.

  • Because of these expenditures, more than 1,100 employment were maintained in the region.
  • According to Park Superintendent Cheryl Schreier, “the people and the business owners in areas that are close to national parks have long acknowledged the economic benefit of their proximity to national parks.” “The Mount Rushmore National Memorial is a renewable source of energy that powers the engine that propels our regional economy.” The majority of the spending and jobs are associated with lodging, food and beverage service, which accounts for 52 percent of the total, followed by other retail, which accounts for 29 percent, entertainment and amusements, which accounts for 10 percent, gas and local transportation, which accounts for 7 percent, and groceries, which accounts for 3 percent (2 percent).

These figures are derived from $12 billion in direct expenditures made by 281 million visitors in 394 national parks and nearby communities. They are included in an annual visitor spending analysis that is peer-reviewed and is carried out by Dr. Daniel Stynes of Michigan State University for the National Park Service.

  1. Local spending by tourists generated $31 billion in additional revenue for the United States economy and supported more than 258,000 employment in 2010, representing increases of $689 million and 11,500 positions over the previous year’s totals.
  2. Visit the following website to obtain a copy of the report: https://www.nature.nps.gov/socialscience/products.cfm#MGM and then choose the report titled “Economic Benefits to Local Communities from Visitor Spending and Payroll in National Parks, 2010.” The report contains data on the amount of money spent by visitors at certain parks and on a state level.

Visit www.nps.gov/southdakota to learn more about the National Park Service’s activities in the state of South Dakota.

How long did it take to make Mount Rushmore?

Mount Rushmore in Keystone, South Dakota, is home to the sculpted faces of four U.S. presidents: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln. The carving of these faces took almost 400 men and women more than 14 years to complete.

David Zalubowski/AP display captions hidden or toggled David Zalubowski/AP Mount Rushmore in Keystone, South Dakota, is home to the sculpted faces of four U.S. presidents: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln. The carving of these faces took almost 400 men and women more than 14 years to complete.

David Zalubowski/AP The death has occurred of the guy who was thought to be the final living sculptor of Mount Rushmore. Donald “Nick” Clifford was one of the almost 400 men and women that contributed to the construction of the first national monument in the United States.

  • According to his wife’s statement to NPR, he passed away on Saturday at the age of 98 at a hospice in Rapid City, South Dakota.
  • Clifford, who had his final birthday in July, was filled with an overwhelming sense of pride for the work he had done on the mountainside when he was a youth.
  • According to what he said to the Rapid City Journal, “I feel as though working on Mount Rushmore was the finest thing with which I was ever involved.” “It tells a tale that will never go away — the story of how America was formed and the men who helped make it what it is today,” she said.

“It tells a story that will never go away.” The bust memorial, which measures 60 feet in height and was sculpted by Gutzon Borglum, was finished after a period of 14 years. The faces of former U.S. Presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln were blasted and carved into the mountain in South Dakota between the years 1927 and 1941 by both men and women.

  • The work was hard, the hours were long, the pay was low, and periods of employment were uncertain,” the National Park Service explains, adding that despite the dangerous conditions, there were no fatalities during the carving work.
  • The work was hard, the hours were long, the pay was low,” the National Park Service explains.

Between the years 1938 and 1940, Clifford was employed there and made 55 cents an hour. According to Clifford’s wife of 45 years, Carolyn, he had spent a significant portion of his younger life anticipating employment at the location. “Nick started working at the Etta mine when he was just 15 years old since you weren’t allowed to work there until you were 17 years old.

  1. On the other hand, the moment he reached 17, he started working on Mount Rushmore “— I quote her.
  2. When Clifford started working as a driller, the busts of Lincoln and Roosevelt were the only two presidents that needed to be sculpted.
  3. He was only six years old when work on the sculpture of Washington first begun.

In his book, Mount Rushmore Q&A, Clifford says, “I understood how to run a jackhammer, and that was the major need.” “When I started drilling Lincoln, Borglum instructed me where to drill and how to do it,” he added. “When I started drilling Lincoln, I had no idea what I was doing.” After finishing his work on the iconic faces, Clifford enlisted in the 8th Air Force and participated in the war during that time.

In the 1970s, he made his way back to Keystone to settle down there permanently. However, it wasn’t until he was far into his senior years that he started to develop the reputation of a local superstar. Although the men who worked on the mountainside eventually went their own ways, finding other jobs, expanding their families, and accomplishing new goals, a significant number of them continued to make frequent trips back to Keystone.

Carolyn said that whenever anything like this would place and Clifford reconnected with old pals, “they would always, eventually, get to chatting about the old days.” “But of course, it is no longer taking place,” she continued to say. “You know that.” Clifford expressed his sadness about the passing of his former coworkers during an interview on his 98th birthday with KOTA TV.

They have all been removed now. I am the very last person, “he added. Since 2004, Clifford and his wife have been able to be seen in the memorial’s gift shop selling copies of the book that they self-published together. “Even though he had a tendency to be reserved at times, he really enjoyed doing it.

He enjoyed going to people’s homes and providing answers to their questions “According to his wife. On the morning of November 8, Clifford told his wife that he was feeling ill while he was working at the gift store. Clifford was working at the gift shop.

  • She rushed him to the emergency department, and he spent the final weeks of his life in and out of the hospital as a result of his condition.
  • He wasn’t ill, and he didn’t have a sickness, but at his age, when you don’t get out of bed and walk about, you get weak,” she added.
  • He didn’t have a condition.” Clifford has three children from a previous marriage, as well as grandkids, great-grandchildren, and great-great-grandchildren.

He is survived by all of his descendants.